19.9.14

| What I Wore | Japan Stories


One of life's certainties is that there is often more to something than just what meets our eyes.

Mask from Japan. T-shirt from Uniqlo Japan. Linen trousers were handmade. Flip flops from Havainas.

For example, this handmade papier-mâché fox mask. Though it is striking as an object in its own right, awakens thoughts from Japanese folklore where the Kitsune are often represented as tricksters, shape shifters and intellectual creatures capable of great wisdom and magic abilities. According to Shinto belief, Kitsune play an important role in serving Inari, the god of rice, fertility, agriculture, tea and sake. This is why kitsune statues are often found close to shrines.

The T-shirt features a traditional Japanese pattern known as chidori which features many tiny plover and translates loosely as 1000 birds. Chidori was believed to be an auspicious symbol for the warrior caste of Japan. Today the Chidori are regarded as an emblem for perseverance and the conquering of obstacles.


There are stories behind patterns of everyday things. We like to think of these as subtle forms of encouragemnt and reminders of our heritage from past generations. 

12 comments:

  1. You guys kind of blow my mind with all the things you know, seriously. The t-shirt did strike me as a great piece, knowing the story makes it great.

    Buckets & Spades

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  2. i love this so much. i'm very much interested in folklore and such. i took an anthropology class waaay back in college and learned about folklore from all over and we had to create an anthology of lores that were unique and specific to our childhood and our homes. it was very interesting to share them and learn. i didn't know what chidori was but the meaning is for the lack of better word, awesome.

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  3. Me too Jane! Folklore fascinates me. I hope to continue with my private study for a long time to come. It's nice to know that it piques the interest of someone else too!

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  4. Whenever I visit WorshipBlues, I feel refreshed! I hope you don't mind me saying, but in this age of running, your blog reminds me to slow down and investigate. It is a beautiful thing, and I thank you both :)

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  5. The last paragraph is so beautifully phrased; so resonant. Yes, patterns speak of stories to us, on conscious and subconscious levels. And we carry those stories, wear them and pass them on...

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  6. thank you for sharing! i am one to wonder each time i saw something as interesting as these and love the fact that the story behind them does not disappoint, at all :)

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  7. Hasini. Thank you! Thank you taking the time to visit us and for leaving this comment. You have really lit up our hearts. Wonderful people like you make blogging worth it!

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  8. Yes!! Like wearing history and folklore in everyday life x

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  9. I love the colours in your photographs. I always feel so relaxed when I read your blog. You inspire me to try harder with my own blog. Thank you for your amazing posts xxx

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  10. You are right, I would think that the t.shirt is just with some random pattern! We learn something everyday :)

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  11. Oh wow, I had no idea of the history and the tales of the Kitsune :)

    Danniella x

    www.famousinjapan.co.uk

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